Lynn George

Lynn George

Lynn George is the founder of Lilliput Productions.  Small, but mighty, Lynn and Lilliput produce short films and web videos.  She has an interesting story about living with a disability – or maybe the more interesting thing about that is that Lynn says “you’re only disabled if you want to be disabled.”

Q: Tell me about something you’re passionate about.

LG: I’m passionate about lots of things. I’m not sure where to begin. I love to travel. I would love to travel to all 50 states (36 so far), and all the continents before I die (I could skip Antarctica).

I’m passionate about telling other people’s stories through film. I love to produce short films. I’ve worked on five student shorts so far. I also love doing corporate or business digital shorts (training videos, commercials, informational, things like that), as well as photography. I started my own business, Lilliput Productions, (http://www.lilliputproductions.com / also on facebook) to do this type of work.

I also love sharing films with others, and helping them find deeper meaning within the films. As a board member of The Friends of The Hershey Public Library I started several film festivals at The Hershey Public Library to do this. There is one going on right now in Feb. every Sunday at 2:00 when we show British Films. I also am in the process of creating a blog to write movie reviews in a short an easy manner for people to read: pizzapicnic.wordpress.com

I also love sharing the stories of Milton Hershey life and legacy. I worked at Chocolate World for 5 years at The Hershey Story, The Museum on Chocolate Ave for 2+ years and love sharing his story to all the tourists that come in and out of my town.

Q: What inspires you?

LG: To make the world a more loving and accepting place. I had a stroke at birth which gave me limited use of my right hand and foot, and from time to time I have seizures. In elementary school I was teased about them and had a hard time. If it wasn’t for my parents who told me I could do anything I set my mind to, I don’t think I would have gone very far. I want to help the world see that people can do incredible things even with setbacks. Everyone in the world has some form of disability and physical disabilities shouldn’t be crippling to people just because of that. There are people who weren’t as lucky as me and I want people to accept them for who they are and not what they see on the outside. I know it’s it an unrealistic goal to change the whole world’s point of view but maybe I can change a few people’s minds.

Q: Tell me about someone who shaped your life without knowing it.

LG: I feel like I thank everyone who shaped my life.  My mum has been the biggest influence telling me to dream big, travel, and introduced me to my biggest joy in life besides film: reading. My 3rd grade teacher, Mrs. Dickinson encouraged me to do anything I wanted and had the amazing talent of getting all the bullies in my class to stop picking on me. She and my mum found a Reading Rainbow video of a lady with one hand who played the guitar, and showed it to the class and it shut them up immediately.

Probably the person that I have never really thanked was Betsy Lord who sat next to me on the bus from the first day of kindergarten to the last day of high school. She loves me unconditionally for who I was. She would always ask me to teach her how to do things one handed, and actually learned and then started do it like me. She also would ask to wear my arm brace, because she thought it was cool. It wasn’t it was a pain in the butt. She was my idea bouncing board and would always tell me the truth even if it hurt. Because of these ladies and my best friend Allison Spooner, I never felt disabled. Even when someone comes up to me, seriously direct quote here from a tourist at The Hershey Story “Can I take a picture of you for my Twitter account? I think it’s great Hershey hires disabled people.” I wanted to punch this guy in the face. You’re only disabled if you want to be disabled. I don’t feel disabled dude. Shut it! I wish and hope that more disabled people can feel this way too.

 

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